Last weekend, we launched The Runner’s Strength Project(RSP) and the response has been great! Runners everywhere are now using the program and are already enjoying it.  Coach Mat is manning the Facebook page, taking questions and providing even more content on how to use strength training to help your running.

We’ve received some great questions about the program so we thought we’d have Mat write up the most common ones so you can determine if the Runner’s Strength Project will help your running.

Q: Why did you create the Runner’s Strength Project?

A: I’ve been using this system with my runners for a number of years and having great results. In order to ever reach your potential as a runner it’s essential that you are injury free and consistent in your training. A few years ago, I saw that too many runners coming to me were weak and couldn’t stay consistent in their training. I knew that if I could create a strength program that would give them the strength to handle running and also fit with their run training and busy work/life schedules, they would excel. That’s where this program was born.

Q: How do I know if the RSP is for me?

A: The RSP program is designed to accommodate all ability levels of runner.  Because the program is progressive, you’re able to pick the appropriate exercise scheme to meet your individual needs and adjust recovery times as needed to control intensity.  Just like run training, having a strength program that can easily be modified to meet the needs of many different ability level athletes is extremely important and a key aspect to any successful program. Remember, everyone requires different levels of exercise stimulus to get her where she wants to go in a safe manner. I’ll guide you through that process in the RSP and monitor the RSP Facebook page to answer your questions as you train. (You can even check out a complimentary core workout I just posted on the RSP Facebook page. Click the image below.)


Q: What is the difference between the RSP program and the other strength programs for runners?
A: I think what Greg liked when he visited my gym and saw the results from my runners was that this program takes the best of strength training (so the training is uber-efficient) and blends it with run training. Since I’m a running coach and strength coach, he liked that the strength program we offer is 100% specialized for the exact needs of the runner.  He’s not a fan of strength trainers that push their runners so hard in the gym that their running suffers.  As a running coach, I understand that. I want runners to be strong but this can’t interfere with their run training. The two must work together. That’s the idea behind the RSP.

It’s also important to acknowledge that runners have very special strength requirements as the day to day demands of our sport are very significant.  You must be tough to be a runner!  A unique level of specialization in training is needed so we are sure not to overstress the lower body of the runner.  This is an area where many strength programs for runners go wrong.  As runners we need complementary strength, not just strength that is just going to wear us down. That’s why we see the best results with routines of shorter repetition ranges.  Our main focus with this program will be on the torso, hips, core, and upper extremities – the parts of the body that provide us with essential stabilization and support to power our running movements. 


Q How can the RSP help me today?

A: By getting started today we can get your body adjusted to your new program before you get into your more serious summer run training or preparation for a fall half or full marathons.  Adding RSP to your program will have an almost immediate effect on your upcoming races.  You will also be able to tolerate a heavier training load in the coming months and will recover much quicker from tough running workouts.

The ability to recover faster, train more consistently, and add some extra work into your program is often that extra push that you need to get you to the next level in your running.  It will make the last half mile of a 5k so much more tolerable and allow you to dig down and finish with that finishing kick that you have been lacking.  And for marathoners, those last 4-6 miles of the marathon can actually be enjoyable with a little extra total body strength.  A common theme of the past season with my marathoners was the statement, “I never hit the wall and I could have kept running right past the finish line!”  Get STRONGER, FITTER and FASTER this year with the Runner’s Strength Project.

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Runner’s Strength Project
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